Inferences during reading

Edward J. O'Brien, Anne E. Cook, Robert F. Lorch

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Inferencing is defined as ‘the act of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be true’, and it is one of the most important processes necessary for successful comprehension during reading. This volume features contributions by distinguished researchers in cognitive psychology, educational psychology, and neuroscience on topics central to our understanding of the inferential process during reading. The chapters cover aspects of inferencing that range from the fundamental bottom up processes that form the basis for an inference to occur, to the more strategic processes that transpire when a reader is engaged in literary understanding of a text. Basic activation mechanisms, word-level inferencing, methodological considerations, inference validation, causal inferencing, emotion, development of inferences processes as a skill, embodiment, contributions from neuroscience, and applications to naturalistic text are all covered as well as expository text, online learning materials, and literary immersion.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWriting Religion
Subtitle of host publicationThe Case for the Critical Study of Religions
Pages1-421
Number of pages421
ISBN (Electronic)9781107279186
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)

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