Influence of valley form on the subsurface state of stress - Application simple elastic models to understand modes of Appalachian coal mine rock failure

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes the use of analytical solutions, accurate to first order in the maximum slow of the topography, for an elastic half space with surface topography to investigate the influence of valley shape and the regional state of stress on styles of coal mine roof failures described from the Appalachian plateau of the eastern United States. The basic solutions yield results for simple sinusoidal topography, and complicated valley shapes are simulated using Fourier series superposition of solutions. Different regional states of stress are simulated by varying a coefficient of lateral earth pressure. For a given state of regional stress, however, changes in valley form yield only small changes in the magnitude and distribution of the mean normal stress and maximum shear stress. Broad-floored valleys produce significantly different displacement and strain fields than do V-notch valleys, independently of the regional state of stress, because the perturbing effects of topography vary as a function of the reciprocal valley width.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication4th North American Rock Mechanics Symposium, NARMS 2000
Pages873-879
Number of pages7
StatePublished - 2000
Event4th North American Rock Mechanics Symposium, NARMS 2000 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Jul 31 2000Aug 3 2000

Publication series

Name4th North American Rock Mechanics Symposium, NARMS 2000

Conference

Conference4th North American Rock Mechanics Symposium, NARMS 2000
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period7/31/008/3/00

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

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