Iniciativas en Estados Unidos para investigar el tratamiento del Abuso de Drogas y la Justicia Penal

Translated title of the contribution: Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJDATS): Editorial on the U. S. research initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Research in the U.S. has consistently shown that drug use and criminal activity are highly related, as evidenced by the growing number of incarcerated substance users in U.S. prisons and jails in the last two decades. The number of incarcerated substance users has led to increased efforts to develop, implement, and test interventions in both institucional programs and community programs at re-entry. In 2002, these efforts facilitated the development of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJDATS) cooperative agreement grants funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). CJDATS has developed twelve research protocols designed to targeted different stages of an offender's progress from institution to community including assessing current practices, promoting structured re-entry, developing screening and referral instruments, and designing new treatment models. In addition, CJDATS has a vested interest in special populations of offenders (such as women offenders) and unique treatment issues (such as HIV). The success of CJDATS is largely dependent on the partnerships developed at the local, state, and national level with administrators and treatment providers in both correctional settings and in the community.

Translated title of the contributionCriminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJDATS): Editorial on the U. S. research initiative
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)305-317
Number of pages13
JournalAdicciones
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Criminal justice
  • Delinquency
  • Drug abuse
  • Recovery
  • Research
  • Treatment
  • USA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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