Instruction and Assessment: How Students With Deaf-Blindness Fare in Large-Scale Alternate Assessments

Maria Thomas White, Brent Garrett, Jacqueline Farmer Kearns, Jennifer Grisham-Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to report the results from a study examining the relationship between educational experiences for students with deaf-blindness and large-scale alternate assessment outcomes. Individualized education plans (IEPs) and instructional practices for 24 students were observed for indicators of best practices for students with deaf-blindness and severe cognitive disabilities. Results indicate that students who had greater opportunities for developing communication and social skills also had better outcomes on a statewide large-scale assessment, yet there was no relationship between assessment outcomes and the quality of a student's IEP or overall instructional programming.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalResearch and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Alternate assessment
  • Deaf-blind
  • IEPs
  • Program quality indicators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health Professions (all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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