Intimate partner violence, relationship status, and protective orders protective orders: Does "living in sin" entail a different experience?

Lisa Shannon, T. K. Logan, Jennifer Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The legal status of women's intimate relationships may allow for different experiences with intimate partner violence (IPV) and the protections received from the criminal justice system. There has been limited research examining differences in IPV and protective orders for women in marital and cohabiting intimate relationships. This study examines differences in experiences with IPV and factors related to protective orders: stipulations, violations, and perceived efficacy in a sample of married (n = 392) and cohabiting (n = 307) women with protective orders. Results suggest (a) married and cohabiting women are significantly different on a number of demographic characteristics; however, after controlling for these demographic differences, (b) married and cohabiting women's experiences with IPV are similar in almost all dimensions, except with the psychological tactic of degradation; and (c) married and cohabiting women receive similar protective order stipulations, experience similar rates of violations, and have the same overall perceptions of safety, freedom, and effectiveness pertaining to the domestic violence order. Implications for policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1114-1129
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Keywords

  • Cohabiting
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Protective orders
  • Relationship status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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