Intimate sexual victimization among women with protective orders: Types and associations of physical and mental health problems

Jennifer Cole, T. K. Logan, Lisa Shannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intimate sexual violence was examined among a sample of women who had recently obtained protective orders against male partners using three groups: no sexual victimization (n = 368), sexual insistence (n = 114), and threatened and/or forced sex (n = 117). Differences in childhood sexual abuse as well as types of partner psychological abuse, stalking, and severe physical violence experiences were found across the groups. Multivariate analysis showed that women with no sexual victimization had significantly fewer mental health problems than women who had experienced sexual insistence and women who had been threatened or forced to have sex. Findings from this study underscore the importance of health, mental health, and criminal justice professionals assessing for a range of sexually abusive acts when working with victims of partner violence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)695-715
Number of pages21
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Partner violence
  • Sexual abuse
  • Sexual assault
  • Sexual coercion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)
  • Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Intimate sexual victimization among women with protective orders: Types and associations of physical and mental health problems'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this