Investigating the Potentially Protective Effects of Neighborhood Processes in Intimate Partner Violence

Kathryn Showalter, Kathryn Maguire-Jack, Sheila Barnhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) are often mothers. This study seeks to further the understanding of IPV in families, as well as social factors that can prevent violence from occurring. Based on existing literature and theory, we hypothesize that social cohesion and informal social control are associated with lower rates of IPV. To test this theory, we use a total sample of 2,344 mothers with partners surveyed in the Families and Child Wellbeing study and analyze the effects of neighborhood social cohesion and informal social control on reported IPV experiences. This was done by using a negative binomial regression. Findings show that informal social control is associated with lower levels of IPV experiences among mothers with partners.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1090-1103
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 26 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Collective efficacy
  • domestic violence
  • intimate partner violence
  • prevention
  • social cohesion
  • social control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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