Is there an association between subjective sleep quality and daily delirium occurrence in critically ill adults? A post hoc analysis of a randomised controlled trial

Matthew S. Duprey, John W. Devlin, Yoanna Skrobik

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6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives Whether and how delirium and sleep quality in the intensive care unit (ICU) are linked remains unclear. A recent randomised trial reported nocturnal low-dose dexmedetomidine (DEX) significantly reduces incident ICU delirium. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (LSEQ) scores were similar between intervention (DEX; n=50) and control (placebo (PLA); n=50) groups. We measured the association between morning LSEQ and delirium occurrence in the prior 24 hours (retrospective analysis) and the association between morning LSEQ and delirium occurrence in the following 24 hours (predictive analysis). Design Post hoc analysis of randomised controlled trial data. Participants Adult ICU patients (n=100) underwent delirium screening twice a day using the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC) if Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) was ≥-3 and patient-reported sleep quality evaluations at 09:00 daily with the LSEQ if RASS was ≥-1. Outcomes The analysis included all 24-hour study periods with LSEQ documentation and matched delirium screening in coma-free patients. Separate logistic regression models controlling for age, baseline Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and DEX/PLA allocation evaluated the association between morning LSEQ and delirium occurrence for both retrospective and predictive analyses. Results The 100 patients spent 1115 24-hour periods in the ICU. Coma, delirium and no delirium occurred in 130 (11.7%), 114 (10.2%) and 871 (78.1%), respectively. In the retrospective analysis, when an LSEQ result was preceded by an ICDSC result (439/985 (44.6%) 24-hour periods), delirium occurred during 41/439 (9.3%) periods. On regression analysis, the LSEQ score had no relationship to prior delirium occurrence (OR (per every 1 point average LSEQ change) 0.97, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.31). For the predictive analysis, among the 387/985 (39.1%) 24-hour periods where an LSEQ result was followed by an ICDSC result, delirium occurred during 56/387 (14.5%) periods. On regression analysis, the LSEQ score did not predict subsequent delirium occurrence (OR (per 1 point LSEQ change) 1.02, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.05). Conclusions The sleep quality ICU patients perceive neither affects nor predicts delirium occurrence. Trial registration number NCT01791296.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere000576
JournalBMJ Open Respiratory Research
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Author(s) (or their employer(s)). Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Keywords

  • clinical epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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