Job Retention Among Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis: Relationship With Prediagnostic Employment and Education; Demographic Characteristics; and Disease Course, Severity, and Complications

James S. Krause, Clara L. Dismuke-Greer, Phillip Rumrill, Karla Reed, Melinda Jarnecke, Deborah Backus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To identify how prediagnosis employment, education, demographic statuses, and disease factors relate to job retention among people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Design: Cross-sectional logit model. Setting: Data were collected at an academic Medical University and a specialty hospital, both in the Southeastern US. Participants: People with MS (N=1126) who were employed at the time of MS diagnosis. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Job retention was measured by employment status at the time of follow-up assessment. Results: Prediagnostic educational attainment was predictive of job retention. Among several prediagnostic employment characteristics, only working in production, transportation, and material moving was significantly related to a lower odds of job retention compared with those working in professional/managerial occupations. Aging factors were strongly related to job retention, with declines in job retention observed with increasing age and years since diagnosis. Non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic participants reported lower odds of job retention than non-Hispanic White participants, although there were no observed effects of sex. A significantly lower job retention rate was observed among those with progressive MS, compared with relapsing-remitting. Job retention was also less likely among people with greater MS severity and fatigue. Conclusions: Job retention strategies and interventions should target people with greater MS complications and severity, as well as non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic persons, because these characteristics are more highly related to job retention than our prediagnostic employment and vocational history.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The contents of this publication were developed under grants from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), 90RT5035. NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this publication do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ADL, or HHS, and it should not be assumed to be an endorsement by the funding agency or Federal Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

Keywords

  • Cognitive dysfunction
  • Employment
  • Fatigue
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation, vocational

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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