Kentucky Outreach Service Kiosk (KyOSK) Study protocol: a community-level, controlled quasi-experimental, type 1 hybrid effectiveness study to assess implementation, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community-tailored harm reduction kiosk on HIV, HCV and overdose risk in rural Appalachia

April M. Young, Jennifer R. Havens, Hannah L.F. Cooper, Amanda Fallin-Bennett, Laura Fanucchi, Patricia R. Freeman, Hannah Knudsen, Melvin D. Livingston, Kathryn E. McCollister, Jack Stone, Peter Vickerman, Edward Freeman, Tasfia Jahangir, Elizabeth Larimore, Carol R. White, Chelsi Cheatom, Ky OSK Community Staff, Ky OSK Design Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction Many rural communities bear a disproportionate share of drug-related harms. Innovative harm reduction service models, such as vending machines or kiosks, can expand access to services that reduce drug-related harms. However, few kiosks operate in the USA, and their implementation, impact and cost-effectiveness have not been adequately evaluated in rural settings. This paper describes the Kentucky Outreach Service Kiosk (KyOSK) Study protocol to test the effectiveness, implementation outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a community-tailored, harm reduction kiosk in reducing HIV, hepatitis C and overdose risk in rural Appalachia. Methods and analysis KyOSK is a community-level, controlled quasi-experimental, non-randomised trial. KyOSK involves two cohorts of people who use drugs, one in an intervention county (n=425) and one in a control county (n=325). People who are 18 years or older, are community-dwelling residents in the target counties and have used drugs to get high in the past 6 months are eligible. The trial compares the effectiveness of a fixed-site, staffed syringe service programme (standard of care) with the standard of care supplemented with a kiosk. The kiosk will contain various harm reduction supplies accessible to participants upon valid code entry, allowing dispensing data to be linked to participant survey data. The kiosk will include a call-back feature that allows participants to select needed services and receive linkage-to-care services from a peer recovery coach. The cohorts complete follow-up surveys every 6 months for 36 months (three preceding kiosk implementation and four post-implementation). The study will test the effectiveness of the kiosk on reducing risk behaviours associated with overdose, HIV and hepatitis C, as well as implementation outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination The University of Kentucky Institutional Review Board approved the protocol. Results will be disseminated in academic conferences and peer-reviewed journals, online and print media, and community meetings. Trial registration number NCT05657106.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere083983
JournalBMJ Open
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • INFECTIOUS DISEASES
  • PUBLIC HEALTH
  • Substance misuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Kentucky Outreach Service Kiosk (KyOSK) Study protocol: a community-level, controlled quasi-experimental, type 1 hybrid effectiveness study to assess implementation, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community-tailored harm reduction kiosk on HIV, HCV and overdose risk in rural Appalachia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this