Kentucky Re-entry Universal Payload System (KRUPS): Overview of flight test via high-altitude balloon

John D. John, J. Tyler Nichols, Collin J. Dietz, Page Askins, Kirsten F. Ford, Andrew Perry, William T. William, Alexandre Martin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The Kentucky Re-entry Universal Payload System (KRUPS) is a small re-entry capsule designed as a technology testbed. For its first incarnation, KRUPS has been designed to test Thermal Protection System (TPS) material and instrumentation. TPS are used to protect spacecraft, and its payload, from the extreme conditions of planetary entry. KRUPS has been developed at the University of Kentucky over the past 6 years. This specific launch aimed to produce system verification, software implementation, and launch qualifications, using an atmospheric balloon platform. The capsule released from the balloon in this experiment, was designed to transmit data using the Iridium satellite network. Recovery of the capsule was planned, using a parachute that aimed at preventing a crash landing and thus protecting the internal components. The capsule was activated and ejected as planned. Thermal measurements of the TPS were received by the capsule as it returned to Earth. This satisfied the main objective of the flight. However, the capsule did not have a successful parachute deployment, due to a timing issue. Therefore, the capsule was not able to be recovered in one piece. The thermal data measured during the descent of this capsule demonstrated the insulative properties of the TPS.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAIAA AVIATION 2022 Forum
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022
EventAIAA AVIATION 2022 Forum - Chicago, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2022Jul 1 2022

Publication series

NameAIAA AVIATION 2022 Forum

Conference

ConferenceAIAA AVIATION 2022 Forum
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityChicago
Period6/27/227/1/22

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
for this project was provided by NASA Flight Opportunities. The KRUPS team would like to thank R. Nolin (U. of Kentucky) for his contribution to the testing of the hardware. The team would like to thank J. Loredo for his contribution to the flight computer software. Thanks to K. Ford (U. of Kentucky) for acquiring the pin puller from TiNi. The KRUPS team would like to thank the senior design team for their contribution to the project in the form of the parachute video camera. Special thanks to P. Askins and J. Boggs of the senior design team for their contributions to the balloon flight in Madras, Oregon. Thanks to B. Childers (U. of Kentucky) for fabricating the back shell. Also thanks to F. Taylor (U. of Kentucky) for the fabrication of the TPS and KREM. Additional thanks to TiNi for the pin puller. The team would especially like to thank the people of Near Space Corporation for their massive amount of help in integration, flight and recovery of the KRUPS capsule. Special thanks to A. Knutson, K. Tucker, T. Lachenmeier and D. Henderson (NSC). Finally, the team would like to thank P. De Leon (NASA Ames) for his oversight of this entire KRUPS project.

Funding Information:
Funding for this project was provided by NASA Flight Opportunities. The KRUPS team would like to thank R. Nolin (U. of Kentucky) for his contribution to the testing of the hardware. The team would like to thank J. Loredo for his contribution to the flight computer software. Thanks to K. Ford (U. of Kentucky) for acquiring the pin puller from TiNi. The KRUPS team would like to thank the senior design team for their contribution to the project in the form of the parachute video camera. Special thanks to P. Askins and J. Boggs of the senior design team for their contributions to the balloon flight in Madras, Oregon. Thanks to B. Childers (U. of Kentucky) for fabricating the back shell. Also thanks to F. Taylor (U. of Kentucky) for the fabrication of the TPS and KREM. Additional thanks to TiNi for the pin puller. The team would especially like to thank the people of Near Space Corporation for their massive amount of help in integration, flight and recovery of the KRUPS capsule. Special thanks to A. Knutson, K. Tucker, T. Lachenmeier and D. Henderson (NSC). Finally, the team would like to thank P. De Leon (NASA Ames) for his oversight of this entire KRUPS project.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering

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