Lack of phenotypic variation despite population structure in larval utilization of pea aphids by populations of the lady beetle Hippodamia convergens

Christy Grenier, Bryce Summerhays, Ryan Cartmill, Tanairi Martinez, Roxane Saisho, Alexander Rothenberg, Alicia Tovar, Andrew Rynerson, Jerrika Scott, John J. Obrycki, Arun Sethuraman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The convergent lady beetle (Hippodamia convergens) is a generalist natural enemy that is utilized extensively in augmentative biological control across the United States. Recent studies have pointed to both genetic and phenotypic differences in Western (California) versus Eastern (Kansas) populations of the species. Here we investigate (1) genetic population structure, and (2) phenotypic differences in the utilization of pea aphids at temperatures that resemble the Western United States in (a) Eastern versus Western populations, (b) F1 Eastern X Western hybrids versus their progenitor populations, and investigate the effects of competition between (c) Eastern and Western populations. We found no differences in final pupal weight, or the net weight gain ratio through larval development from the third instar to pupal stage, despite genetic population structure. Our study points towards plastic response and effectiveness in feeding phenotypes of Eastern and Western populations of H. convergens, and the absence of hybrid vigor and heterozygote advantages in hybrids.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104507
JournalBiological Control
Volume155
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • Augmentative biological control
  • Phenotypic plasticity
  • Population structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Insect Science

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