Life-Course Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Cardiovascular Events in Black and White Adults in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

Qian Xiao, Gerardo Heiss, Anna Kucharska-Newton, Ganga Bey, Shelly Ann M. Love, Eric A. Whitsel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

It has been reported that residents of low–socioeconomic-status (SES) neighborhoods have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, most of the previous studies focused on 1-time measurement of neighborhood SES in middle-to-older adulthood and lacked demographic diversity to allow for comparisons across different race/ethnicity and sex groups. We examined neighborhood SES in childhood and young, middle, and older adulthood in association with CVD risk among Black and White men and women in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1996–2019). We found that lower neighborhood SES in young, middle, and older adulthood, but not in childhood, was associated with a higher risk of CVD later in life. When compared with the highest quartile, the lowest quartile of neighborhood SES in young, middle, and older adulthood was associated with 18% (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.36), 21% (HR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.39), and 12% (HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.26) increases in the hazard of total CVD, respectively. The association between lower neighborhood SES in older adulthood and higher CVD hazard was particularly strong among Black women. Our study findings support the role of neighborhood SES in cardiovascular health in both Black and White adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1470-1484
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume191
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2022.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • health disparities
  • life course
  • neighborhood socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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