Lipid peroxidation and tyrosine nitration in traumatic brain injury: Insights into secondary injury from redox proteomics

D. Allan Butterfield, Tanea T. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a spontaneous event in which sudden trauma and secondary injury cause brain damage. Symptoms of TBI can range from mild to severe depending on extent of injury. The outcome can span from complete patient recovery to permanent memory loss and neurological decline. Currently, there is no known cure for TBI; however, immediate medical attention after injury is most beneficial for patient recovery. It is a well-established concept that imbalances in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and native antioxidant mechanisms have been shown to increase oxidative stress. Over the years, proteomics has been used to identify specific biomarkers in diseases such as cancers and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. As TBI is a risk factor for a multitude of neurological diseases, biomarkers for this phenomenon are a likely field of study in order to confirm diagnosis. This review highlights the current proteomics studies that investigated excessively nitrated proteins and those altered by lipid peroxidation in TBI. This review also highlights possible diagnostic measures and provides insights for future treatment strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1191-1204
Number of pages14
JournalProteomics - Clinical Applications
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

Keywords

  • mass spectrometry
  • oxidative stress
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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