Long-term survival after pneumonectomy for non-small-cell lung cancer

Rohan J. Kalathiya, Daniel Davenport, Sibu P. Saha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: to investigate long-term survival in patients who underwent pneumonectomy for non-small-cell lung cancer at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Methods: we retrospectively reviewed 100 consecutive pneumonectomy cases from 1998 to 2009 at the University of Kentucky. We were able to obtain follow-up data on 99 of 100 patients. Results: overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival was 66%, 48%, and 32%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 5- survival for left pneumonectomy was 76%, 55%, and 40%, respectively, compared to 56%, 44%, and 22%, respectively, for right pneumonectomy. The median survival for left pneumonectomy was 2.4 years compared to 1.2 years for right pneumonectomy (p=0.056). The 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with stage I disease was 34%, compared to 19% for stage II disease, and 38% for stage III disease. The 5-year survival for patients who underwent neoadjuvant therapy was 31% compared to 39% for patients who received adjuvant therapy and 29% for patients who received surgery alone. These results were also not statistically significant. Conclusion: neoadjuvant therapy did not adversely affect long-term survival in our study. When compared to left pneumonectomy, right pneumonectomy for non-small-cell lung cancer is associated with adverse postoperative outcomes as well as poorer long-term survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)574-581
Number of pages8
JournalAsian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

Keywords

  • Carcinoma
  • neoadjuvant therapy
  • non-small-cell lung
  • pneumonectomy
  • postoperative complications
  • survival rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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