Maceral and microlithotype response to oil agglomeration for selected eastern Kentucky high volatile a bituminous coals

James C. Hower, Kenneth W. Kuehn, B. K. Parekh, William M. Andrews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The petrographic response of three high volatile A bituminous, petrographically complex eastern Kentucky coals to oil agglomeration was tested using several agglomerating oils. Four oils, hexane, fuel oil, kerosene, and pentane, were tested on the Leatherwood coal, the intermediate coal in the rank series. The testing scheme for the other two coals consisted of using only the hexane and fuel oil with a lesser number of tests than on the initial coal tested. Coal rank emerges as a significant parameter in the behavior of the coals. Particularly for the hexane agglomeration. the coals had quite different behaviors, with the highest-rank coal having greater clean-coal yield at lower oil concentrations than the other two coals. The two high-rank coals exhibit similar yield curves for fuel oil, with the lower-rank coal achieving the yield of the latter coals at higher oil concentrations. The role of the organic petrography and the mineral matter, both closely associated with the macerals in carhominerite microlithotypes and organic-dominant microlithotypes, is an obvious complicating factor. A tendency for duroclarite, the vitrinite-rich trimaceral microlitho-type, to partition between vitrinite-rich varieties in the concentrate and vitrinite-poor varieties in the tails was noted at higher oil concentrations for all three coals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-198
Number of pages14
JournalFuel Processing Technology
Volume50
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1997

Keywords

  • Eastern kentucky coals
  • Hexane
  • Oil agglomeration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemical Engineering
  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

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