Maltreatment, resilience, and sexual relationship power in a sample of justice-involved women with opioid use disorder

Jaxin Annett, Martha Tillson, Megan Dickson, Mary Levi, J. Matthew Webster, Michele Staton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Justice-involved women frequently report maltreatment and intimate relationships characterized by violence and abuse throughout adulthood. The present study aimed to (a) investigate the association between victimization and sexual relationship power (SRP) among justice-involved women with opioid use disorder (OUD) and (b) explore resilience as a potential moderating factor of the association between victimization and SRP. Under the ongoing Kentucky Justice Community Opioid Innovation Network (JCOIN) cooperative, justice-involved women (N = 700) were randomly selected from eight jails in Kentucky, screened for OUD, consented to participate, and interviewed by research staff. SRP was examined using the Sexual Relationship Power Scale, a validated instrument with two distinct subscales measuring decision-making dominance (DMD) and relationship control (RC); prior maltreatment was measured using the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs General Victimization Scale, and resilience was assessed using the Brief Resilience Scale. Linear regression was used to examine the association between maltreatment and SRP, with three models constructed to account for SRP, DMD, and RC, controlled for demographic characteristics. Finally, we examined whether the association between victimization and SRP varied as a function of resilience. Significant negative associations between maltreatment and the SRP were observed, ps <.001. Resilience moderated the association between maltreatment and DMD, p =.005; however, resilience did not moderate the associations between maltreatment and SRP, p =.141, or RC, p =.735. These findings highlight the importance of increasing resilience in justice-involved women with OUD to reduce the impact of maltreatment on SRP. Prioritizing resilience may offer significant benefits for preventing and addressing maltreatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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