Maternal effects on offspring size: Variation through early development of chinook salmon

Daniel D. Heath, Charles W. Fox, John W. Heath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

215 Scopus citations

Abstract

We performed two breeding experiments with chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to explore maternal effects on offspring size. We estimated the magnitude of maternal effects as the differences between sire-offspring and dam-offspring regression slopes. Early in life, offspring size is largely influenced by maternal size, but this influence decreases through early development, with the maternal effect becoming negative at intermediate offspring ages (corresponding to a period of reduced growth of progeny hatching from large eggs) and converging on zero as offspring age. Also, egg size was positively correlated with early survival, but negatively correlated with maternal fecundity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1605-1611
Number of pages7
JournalEvolution
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999

Keywords

  • Compensatory growth
  • Fecundity
  • Growth
  • Optimality
  • Salmon
  • Selection
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Maternal effects on offspring size: Variation through early development of chinook salmon'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this