Measurement of high reynolds number turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer using unmanned aerial vehicles

Sean C.C. Bailey, Brandon M. Witte, Cornelia Schlagenhauf, Brian R. Greene, Phillip B. Chilson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of recently conducted experiments in which atmospheric boundary layer turbulence was measured by unmanned aerial vehicles. These experiments were conducted as part of a larger, multi-university measurement campaign. Results from profiling flights, used to characterize the atmospheric boundary layer characteristics are presented. Relative statistics are then presented, measured at different times during the boundary layer transition from stably stratified to convective conditions. The turbulence statistics are found to agree with the expected general behavior, but have the advantage of being less dependent on Taylor's frozen flow hypothesis hypothesis to translate time-dependent information to spatial information.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication10th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2017
ISBN (Electronic)9780000000002
StatePublished - 2017
Event10th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2017 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Jul 6 2017Jul 9 2017

Publication series

Name10th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2017
Volume4

Conference

Conference10th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityChicago
Period7/6/177/9/17

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through grant #CBET-1351411 and by National Science Foundation award #1539070, Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (CLOUDMAP). The authors would like to thank Ryan Nolin, Caleb Canter, Jonathan Hamilton, Elizabeth Pillar-Little, William Sanders, and Robert Singler who worked tirelessly to build, maintain, and fly the unmanned vehicles used in this study.

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2016 Zakon Group LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Aerospace Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Measurement of high reynolds number turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer using unmanned aerial vehicles'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this