Menthol cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adults

Amanda Fallin, Amie J. Goodin, Brian A. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Menthol can mask the harshness and taste of tobacco, making menthol cigarettes easier to use and increasing their appeal among vulnerable populations. The tobacco industry has targeted youth, women, and racial minorities with menthol cigarettes, and these groups smoke menthol cigarettes at higher rates. The tobacco industry has also targeted the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities with tobacco product marketing. Purpose: To assess current menthol cigarette smoking by sexual orientation among a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Methods: Data were obtained from the 2009-2010 National Adult Tobacco Survey, a national landline and cellular telephone survey of non-institutionalized U.S. adults aged ≥18 years, to compare current menthol cigarette smoking between LGBT (n=2,431) and heterosexual/straight (n=110,841) adults. Data were analyzed during January - April 2014 using descriptive statistics and logistic regression adjusted for sex, age, race, and educational attainment. Results: Among all current cigarette smokers, 29.6% reported usually smoking menthol cigarettes in the past 30 days. Menthol use was signi ficantly higher among LGBT smokers, with 36.3% reporting that the cigarettes they usually smoked were menthol compared to 29.3% of heterosexual/ straight smokers (p<0.05); this difference was particularly prominent among LGBT females (42.9%) compared to heterosexual/straight women (32.4%) ( p<0.05). Following adjustment, LGBT smokers had greater odds of usually smoking menthol cigarettes than heterosexual/straight smokers (OR=1.31, 95% CI=1.09, 1.57). Conclusions: These findings suggest that efforts to reduce menthol cigarette use may have the potential to reduce tobacco use and tobacco-related disease and death among LGBT adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-97
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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