Methacrylate perspective in current dental practice

Susan Bishop, Howard Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To provide a current perspective concerning dental personnel sensitivity to methacrylate materials. Overview: Methacrylate related sensitivity and allergies are currently beyond traditional thoughts concerning denture base resins and methyl methacrylate provisional materials. Methacrylates are now ubiquitous in current dental practice and dental personnel should be aware that dental adhesives contain potent sensitizers that may also cross-sensitize individuals to other methacrylates not experienced. The growing sensitivity to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) has been described to be epidemic in nature due to the artificial nail industry with dental patients and dental personnel may be more susceptible to dental methacrylate sensitization. While contact dermatitis remains the most prevalent methacrylate-related clinical presentation, respiratory complications and asthma are increasing associated with methacrylate exposure. While additional personal protective equipment (PPE) is thought to be first protective choice, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) considers PPE overall largely ineffective and should be considered only as a last resort. Conclusion: Dental personnel need to be more aware of methacrylate sources and use workplace control measures to limit methacrylate exposures to both dental personnel and patients. Clinical Significance: Sensitivity to methacrylate materials is a growing dental workplace major concern and dental personnel should be aware of both the methacrylate content of current materials and the products that contain ingredients with the most sensitization potential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)673-680
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. Any opinions expressed by the senior author are his own and do not constitute the official opinion of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the Department of Defense, or the US Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC

Keywords

  • NIOSH
  • allergy
  • dental adhesives
  • methacrylate
  • reactive airway disease
  • sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry (all)

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