Modeling high velocity flow through porous media

Ümran Düzel, Alexandre Martin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Modelling the interactions between porous flow and pure flow at atmospheric entry conditions is a challenging task. New models and high fidelity numerical tools are required to better understand porous material and aerothermal flow interactions for ablation problems at different flow regimes. Volume Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (VANS) are applied to develop a universal solver (KATS-US) that solves both porous and flow domains at the same time. Numerical testing and verification is carried out through two benchmark channel flow problems. Additionally, a set of simulations of a permeable arc-jet test sample is carried out under supersonic and hypersonic flow conditions in order to study high velocity flow through porous materials. A qualitative assessment of shock formation, porous flow development, pressure change across the porous sample and temperature evolution throughout the porous domain is studied. An ablative test case is studied under high velocity flow to assess the ablation model capability of the newly developed tool. Moreover, the numerical tool is used to model HyMETS test case and the predictions are compared for FiberForm® test sample.

Original languageEnglish
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 2020
EventAIAA Scitech Forum, 2020 - Orlando, United States
Duration: Jan 6 2020Jan 10 2020

Conference

ConferenceAIAA Scitech Forum, 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period1/6/201/10/20

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial support for this work was provided by NASA SpaceTech-REDDI ESI Award NNX16AD18G. The authors would like to thank F. Panerai (University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign), S. Bailey (Univeristy of Kentucky), M. Wright (NASA Ames), S.Splinter, J. Gragg and W. Geouge (NASA Langley) for the experimental results obtained at HYMETS under NASA EPSCoR AWARD NNX13AN04A. They would also like to thank M. Thompson, L. Campbell and G. Blomquist (University of Kentucky) for the x-ray scans.

Funding Information:
Financial support for this work was provided by NASA SpaceTech-REDDI ESI Award NNX16AD18G. The authors would like to thank F. Panerai (University of Illinois at Urbana?Champaign), S. Bailey (Univeristy of Kentucky), M. Wright (NASA Ames), S.Splinter, J. Gragg and W. Geouge (NASA Langley) for the experimental results obtained at HYMETS under NASA EPSCoR AWARD NNX13AN04A. They would also like to thank M. Thompson, L. Campbell and G. Blomquist (University of Kentucky) for the x-ray scans.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

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