Molecular mechanisms of metabolic associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD): functional analysis of lipid metabolism pathways

Olufunto O. Badmus, Sarah A. Hillhouse, Christopher D. Anderson, Terry D. Hinds, David E. Stec

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) is a condition of fat accumulation in the liver in combination with metabolic dysfunction in the form of overweight or obesity and insulin resistance. It is also associated with an increased cardiovascular disease risk, including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Hepatic lipid metabolism is regulated by a combination of the uptake and export of fatty acids, de novo lipogenesis, and fat utilization by β-oxidation. When the balance between these pathways is altered, hepatic lipid accumulation commences, and long-term activation of inflammatory and fibrotic pathways can progress to worsen the liver disease. This review discusses the details of the molecular mechanisms regulating hepatic lipids and the emerging therapies targeting these pathways as potential future treatments for MAFLD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1347-1366
Number of pages20
JournalClinical Science
Volume136
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [grant numbers R01DK126884 (to D.E.S.) and R01DK121797 (to T.D.H.J.)]; the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute [grant number P01HL05197-11 (to D.E.S.)]; and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences [grant number P20GM104357-02 (to D.E.S.)].

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [grant numbers R01DK126884 (to D.E.S.) and R01DK121797 (to T.D.H.J.)]; the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute [grant number P01HL05197-11 (to D.E.S.)]; and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences [grant number P20GM104357-02 (to D.E.S.)]. Figure 2 was created by Matthew Hazzard at the University of Kentucky. Figures 3–5 were made using BioRender.com.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s).

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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