Monetary Cost of the MyPlate Diet in Young Adults: Higher Expenses Associated with Increased Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

Rashel L. Clark, Oluremi A. Famodu, Makenzie L. Barr, Rebecca L. Hagedorn, Jane Ruseski, Jade A. White, Caitlin M. Warner, Alexandra M. Morrell, Pamela J. Murray, I. Mark Olfert, Joseph W. McFadden, Marianne T. Downes, Sarah E. Colby, Melissa D. Olfert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Cost is a commonly reported barrier to healthy eating. This is a secondary research analysis designed to examine the food expenditures of young adults on a university campus following the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) MyPlate guidelines for fruits and vegetables. Methods. Meal receipts and dietary intake were recorded weekly. Anthropometrics and clinical assessments were recorded before intervention. Researchers rated compliance based on the participant's dietary food log, receipt matching, food pictures, and reports during weekly 1-hour consultations. Results. Fifty-three young adults (18-30 years old) at-risk of, or diagnosed with, metabolic syndrome (MetS) were enrolled in the study, with 10 excluded (n = 43) from analyses due to enrollment in a fixed cost university campus dining meal plan. A two sample t-test assessed differences in food costs and regression analysis determined associations between food cost and diet compliance while controlling for confounding factors of age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Diet compliant subjects (n = 38) had higher weekly food cost at $95.73 compared to noncompliant subjects (n = 5) who spent $66.24 (p=0.01). A regression analysis controlling for age, sex, BMI, and geographical region also indicated cost differences based on diet compliance (p<0.0001). Conclusion. Results indicate an ∼$29.00 per week increase in food cost when eating the recommended amount of fruit and vegetables. These findings can contribute to research incentive design, program planning cost, and determining effective interventions to improve diet in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2790963
JournalJournal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume2019
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
-e authors thank the entire FRUVEDomics research team at West Virginia University. -is work was funded by the following grants: USDA/AFRI #2014-67001-21851; WVU Hatch WVA00641; WV Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NIH/NIGMS Award Number U54GM104942); WVU Mountains of Excellence Pilot Grant Program; and WVU Pediatrics Department Grant.

Funding Information:
The authors thank the entire FRUVEDomics research team at West Virginia University. This work was funded by the following grants: USDA/AFRI #2014-67001-21851; WVU Hatch WVA00641; WV Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NIH/NIGMS Award Number U54GM104942); WVU Mountains of Excellence Pilot Grant Program; and WVU Pediatrics Department Grant.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Rashel L. Clark et al.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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