Mood management intervention for college smokers with elevated depressive symptoms: A pilot study

Holly E. Schleicher, Kari Jo Harris, Duncan G. Campbell, Solomon W. Harrar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT). Participants and Methods: Fifty-eight smokers (smoked 6 days in the past 30) were randomized to 6 sessions of CBT (n = 29) or a nutrition-focused attention-matched control group (CG; n = 29). Results: Relative to CG participants, significantly more CBT participants reduced smoking intensity by 50% (χ 2[1, N = 58] = 4.86, p =.028) at end of treatment. Although CBT participants maintained smoking reductions at 3- and 6-month follow-up, group differences were no longer significant. No group differences in cessation emerged. Finally, participants in both groups evidenced increased motivation to reduce smoking at end of treatment (F[1, 44] = 11.717, p =.001, η p 2 =.207). Conclusions: Findings demonstrate the utility of this intervention for smoking reduction and maintenance of reductions over time among a population of college students with elevated depressive symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-45
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (F31DA023738, principal investigator: Schleicher) and The University of Montana. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIDA or the National Institutes of Health.

Keywords

  • cigarette smoking
  • college students
  • depressive symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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