Nitrogen in Soils - Cycle

M. S. Coyne, W. W. Frye

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nitrogen (N) is the element most often limiting plant nutrition in terrestrial ecosystems. The greatest source of available N is atmospheric dinitrogen (N 2), which is relatively inert and can only be used by symbiotic and free-living prokaryotic bacteria with the capacity for N 2 fixation ( Table 1 ). For other plants and soil organisms, the slow release of N from rocks and minerals and cycling between organic and inorganic forms in soil is crucial to life. Unfortunately, some aspects of N cycling can be problematic. Nitrogen can be readily lost from terrestrial soils, leading to reduced fertility and surface- or groundwater contamination, and several transformations give rise to intermediate or final products that can have negative environmental consequences.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Soils in the Environment
Pages13-21
Number of pages9
Volume4
ISBN (Electronic)9780080547954
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Nitrogen in Soils - Cycle'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this