Nodal upstaging during lung cancer resection is associated with surgical approach presented at the Sixty-first Annual Meeting of the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association, Tucson, AZ, Nov 5-8, 2014.

Jeremiah T. Martin, Eric B. Durbin, Li Chen, Tamas Gal, Angela Mahan, Victor Ferraris, Joseph Zwischenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Recent reports indicate that thoracoscopic lobectomy for lung cancer may be associated with lower rates of surgical upstaging. We queried a statewide cancer registry for differences in upstaging rates and survival by surgical approach. Methods The Kentucky Cancer Registry (KCR) collects data, including centralized pathology reporting, on cancer patients treated statewide. We performed a retrospective review from 2010 to 2012 to examine clinical and pathologic stage. We assessed rates of upstaging and whether the surgical approach, thoracotomy (THOR) versus minimally invasive techniques (video-assisted thoracic surgery; VATS), had an impact on final pathologic stage and survival. Results The KCR database from 2010 to 2012 contained information on 2830 lung cancer cases, 1964 having THOR procedure and 500 having VATS resections. Preoperatively, 36.4% of THOR were clinically stage 1a versus 47.4% VATS (p = 0.0002). Of these, final pathologic stage remained stage 1a in 30.5% of THOR procedures and 38.0% of VATS (p = 0.0002). The overall nodal upstaging rate for THOR was 9.9% and 4.8% for VATS (p = 0.002). Decreased nodal upstaging was found with VATS, independent of tumor size and extent of resection (odds ratio 0.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.387 to 0.985, p = 0.04). However, improved survival was found with VATS compared with THOR (hazard ratio 0.733, 95% CI: 0.592 to 0.907, p = 0.0042). Conclusions Consistent with other reports, we report a lower upstaging rate with VATS. Nevertheless, there is a survival advantage in VATS patients. Although selection bias may play a role in these observed differences, the improved quality of life measures associated with VATS may explain survival improvement despite lower surgical upstaging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-245
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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