Nonstoichiometry and Li-ion transport in lithium zirconate: The role of oxygen vacancies

Xiaowen Zhan, Yang Tse Cheng, Mona Shirpour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding Li-ion migration mechanisms and enhancing Li-ion transport in Li2ZrO3 (LZO) is important to its role as solid absorbent for reversible CO2 capture at elevated temperatures, as ceramic breeder in nuclear reactors, and as electrode coating in high-voltage lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Although defect engineering is an effective way to tune the properties of ceramics, the defect structure of LZO is largely unknown. This study reports the defect structure and electrical properties of undoped LZO and a series of cation-doped LZOs: (i) depending on their charge states, cation dopants can control the oxygen vacancy concentration in doped LZOs; (ii) the doped LZOs with higher oxygen vacancy concentrations exhibit better Li+ conductivity, and consequently faster high-temperature CO2 absorption. In fact, the Fe (II)-doped LZO shows the highest Li-ion conductivity reported for LZOs, reaching 3.3 mS/cm at ~300°C that is more than 1 order of magnitude higher than that of the undoped LZO.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4053-4065
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Ceramic Society
Volume101
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Use of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The authors would like to acknowledge the support from US National Science Foundation Award 1355438 (Powering the Kentucky Bioeconomy for a Sustainable Future). Xiaowen Zhan and Mona Shirpour thank the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at the University of Kentucky for its financial support of this work. The authors also thank Long Zhang and Shuang Gao at the University of Kentucky for assisting with XPS and SEM experiments.

Funding Information:
U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Grant/Award Number: DE-AC02-06CH11357; US National Science Foundation, Grant/Award Number: 1355438

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 The American Ceramic Society

Keywords

  • dopants/doping
  • electrical properties
  • lithium-ion transport
  • nonstoichiometry
  • oxygen vacancies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

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