Notes on the origin of the resinite-rich "pine needle" lithotype of the Cretaceous Cambria coal, Weston County, Wyoming

Michelle N. Johnston, James C. Hower, Fredrick J. Rich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Cretaceous Cambria coal, located in the western part of the Black Hills in Weston County, Wyoming, was mined in the late-1800's and early-1900's primarily to serve the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad on its route from Lincoln, Nebraska to Billings, Montana. The coal bed contains a distinctive resinite-rich lithotype, commonly known as the "pine needle coal." The coal is characterized by a collodetrinite/inertodetrinite/liptodetrinite lithotype, and the liptodetrinite including the resinite, represents a degraded residue of what was originally a deposit with a greater representation of wood-derived material.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-69
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Coal Geology
Volume130
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2014

Keywords

  • Coal petrology
  • Cretaceous
  • Palynology
  • Resin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fuel Technology
  • Geology
  • Economic Geology
  • Stratigraphy

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