Organization of transient projections from the primary somatosensory cortex to the cerebellar nuclei in kittens

T. Pittman, D. L. Tolbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The organization of transient projections from the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) to the cerebellar nuclei was studied in neonatal cats. Tritiated amino acids were injected into the face, forelimb, or hindlimb areas of SI in 4 to 6-day-old kittens. The animals were killed 3 to 6 days later and their brains processed for autoradiography. Labeled axons were found bilaterally in the cerebellar nuclei, but, although the distribution of label was similar on both sides, the label was always much denser on the side of the injection. Each area of SI demonstrated a characteristic pattern of projection to the cerebellar nuclei. Neurons in the hindlimb area projected to the rostral part of the anterior interpositus nucleus, the caudal part of the posterior interpositus nucleus, and the medial quadrant of the dentate nucleus. Fibers from the forelimb area were directed to the caudal part of the anterior interpositus and the rostral part of the posterior interpositus. Projections from the face area terminated principally in the caudal pole of the posterior interpositus. A small transitional area between the interpositus and fastigial nuclei was labeled with all injections. These data indicate that transient neocortical projections to the deep nuclei are organized and that the somatotopy of these projections is similar to that of other cerebellar nuclear connections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-447
Number of pages7
JournalAnatomy and Embryology
Volume178
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1988

Keywords

  • CNS development
  • Cerebellar nuclei
  • Somatosensory
  • Transient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Embryology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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