Outcome of kidney transplant in primary, repeat, and kidney-after-nonrenal solid-organ transplantation: 15-year analysis of recent UNOS database

A. El-Husseini, A. Aghil, J. Ramirez, B. Sawaya, N. Rajagopalan, M. Baz, X. Mei, D. L. Davenport, R. Gedaly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The number of nonrenal solid-organ transplants increased substantially in the last few decades. Many of these patients develop renal failure and receive kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient and kidney allograft survival in primary, repeat, and kidney-after-nonrenal organ transplantation using national data reported to United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) from January 2000 through December 2014. Survival time for each patient was stratified into the following: Group A (comparison group)—recipients of primary kidney transplant (178 947 patients), Group B—recipients of repeat kidney transplant (17 819 patients), and Group C—recipients of kidney transplant performed after either a liver, heart, or lung transplant (2365 patients). We compared survivals using log-rank test. Compared to primary or repeat kidney transplant, patient and renal allograft survival was significantly lower in those with previous nonrenal organ transplant. Renal allograft and patient survival after liver, heart, or lung transplants are comparable. Death was the main cause of graft loss in patients who had prior nonrenal organ transplant.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13108
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • UNOS
  • kidney transplantation
  • nephrology
  • organ allocation
  • outcomes research
  • registry studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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