Overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase suppresses tumor formation by modulation of activator protein-1 signaling in a multistage skin carcinogenesis model

Yunfeng Zhao, Kelley K. Kiningham, Shu Mei Lin, Hsiu Chuan Yen, Hideyuki Majima, Judy Hines, Daret St. Clair, Yi Xue, Terry D. Oberley, Terry D. Oberley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

171 Scopus citations

Abstract

Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a nuclear encoded primary antioxidant enzyme localized in mitochondria. Because expression of MnSOD plays a major role in maintaining cellular redox status and reactive oxygen species are known to play a role in signal transduction and carcinogenesis, we investigated the role of MnSOD in the development of cancer using a two-stage [7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)-anthracene plus 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)] skin carcinogenesis model. Female transgenic mice expressing the human MnSOD gene in the skin and their nontransgenic counterparts were used in this study. Pathological examination demonstrated significant reduction of papilloma formation in transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins showed greater accumulation of oxidative damage products in nontransgenic compared with transgenic mice, and this oxidative damage was demonstrated to be present in both mitochondria and nucleus. TPA increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding activity within 6 h in nontransgenic mice, but increased AP-1 binding activity was delayed in the transgenic mice. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, transcription of the target genes, and Western analysis studies indicated that the increased AP-1 binding activity was attributable to induction of the Jun but not the Fos protein families. Overexpression of MnSOD selectively inhibited the TPA-induced activation of protein kinase Cε and prevented subsequent activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase in response to TPA. Overall, these results indicate that MnSOD regulates both cellular redox status and selectively modulates PKCε signaling, thereby delaying AP-1 activation and inhibiting tumor promotion, resulting in reduction of tumors in MnSOD transgenic mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6082-6088
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Research
Volume61
Issue number16
StatePublished - Aug 15 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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