Participant gender, stalking myth acceptance, and gender role stereotyping in perceptions of intimate partner stalking: a structural equation modeling approach

Emily E. Dunlap, Kellie Rose Lynch, Jennifer A. Jewell, Nesa E. Wasarhaley, Jonathan M. Golding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present research used a mock juror experiment (N = 360) to assess two primary goals: (1) to examine the direct and indirect effects of participant gender, stalking myth acceptance, and gender role stereotyping on guilt ratings in a stalking trial; and (2) to examine the role of perceived victim fear and distress, and defendant intended danger on perceptions of a stalking trial. Using structural equation modeling, we found an indirect effect of participant gender, and both direct and indirect effects of stalking myth acceptance and gender role stereotyping on guilt ratings. Men and participants who endorsed more traditional gender role stereotypes were associated with adherence to stalking myth acceptance beliefs. Endorsement of particular stalking myth acceptance beliefs offers a partial explanation for why women and men differed on perceptions of the defendant's intent to cause danger and the victim's perceived fear and distress. Results provide insight into the efficacy of current anti-stalking legislation that relies on a juror's capacity to evaluate an ‘objective’ interpretation (i.e., ‘reasonable person’) standard of fear for intimate partner stalking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-253
Number of pages20
JournalPsychology, Crime and Law
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 16 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • gender roles
  • juror decision-making
  • stalking
  • stalking laws
  • stalking myths

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • General Psychology
  • Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Participant gender, stalking myth acceptance, and gender role stereotyping in perceptions of intimate partner stalking: a structural equation modeling approach'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this