Patients With Depression and/or Anxiety Having Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Show Decreased Number of Prescriptions and Number of Psychotherapy Sessions in the Year After Surgery

Varag Abed, Nicole G. Lemaster, Gregory S. Hawk, Katherine L. Thompson, Caitlin E.W. Conley, Scott D. Mair, Cale A. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether the utilization of psychological treatments changes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR) for patients with preoperative depression and/or anxiety. Methods: The Truven Healthcare Marketscan database was used to identify patients who underwent arthroscopic RCR between January 2009 and December 2016. We included all patients with diagnosis codes associated with either depression or anxiety before RCR. Patients were excluded if they did not have complete insurance coverage for 1 year before or after surgery, or if they had arthroscopic RCR in the year before the index surgical procedure. We compared the proportion of patients with preoperative depression or anxiety who filled a prescription and had psychotherapy procedural codes in the year before and the year after arthroscopic RCR. Results: A total of 170,406 patients who underwent RCR were identified, of which depression and/or anxiety was found in 46,737 patients (43.7% male). Of the 46,737 patients, 19.6% filled a prescription for a depression/anxiety medication at least once in the year before surgery. Of this subset of patients, 41.5% did not fill a prescription for depression or anxiety medication after surgery, whereas 32.6% continued medication use but demonstrated a median 30-day reduction in the number of days’ worth of medication. Similarly, 13.1% of patients were attending psychotherapy sessions preoperatively, but 76.6% of those patients either stopped or reduced the amount of psychotherapy sessions in the year following RCR. Conclusions: The number of prescriptions and psychotherapy sessions decreased in the year after RCR for patients with preoperative diagnoses of depression and/or anxiety. Level of Evidence: Level IV, case series.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2438-2442.e9
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume39
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Arthroscopy Association of North America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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