Peer influence of injection drug use cessation among dyads in rural eastern Kentucky

Abby E. Rudolph, Elizabeth Upton, Madelyn J. McDonald, April M. Young, Jennifer R. Havens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This analysis aims to assess whether injection drug use cessation among peers predicts injection drug use cessation among individuals and explores whether this association varies by relationship type and strength. Methods: Data were collected through baseline and 6-month assessments for the Social Networks among Appalachian People study (2008–2011). Interviewer-administered surveys collected sociodemographic and drug use behaviors (past 6 months and lifetime). Participants also listed sex, drug use, and social support partners (past 6 months). Listed names were cross-referenced with survey participants to identify relationships between study participants. The analytic sample was further restricted to include only those relationship pairs where both individuals reported a history of injection drug use at baseline (n = 244 unique individuals and 746 dyads). We fit a generalized estimating equations logistic regression model to (1) assess the relationship between peer injection cessation and individual injection cessation and (2) determine whether the strength of this association differs by relationship-level variables (i.e., relationship role, relationship type, relationship duration, frequency of interaction, residential proximity). Results: Overall, those with a network member who ceased injection drug use were more likely to stop injecting over the following 6-month period (AOR=1.65). The magnitude of this association was greater for social support partners (AOR=2.95), family members (AOR=3.56), those with whom the participant interacted at least daily (AOR=2.17), and those who the participant knew longer (AOR=2.09). Further, among family members, the effect size was greater when relationships were further restricted to immediate family members (AOR=5.35). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that in this rural community, closer, more supportive relationships, may be more influential for modeling injection cessation; however, relationship-types were not mutually exclusive so differences in effect size across strata may not be statistically significant. In this setting, social support through the recovery process (including cessation attempts with peers) may increase likelihood of injection cessation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102604
JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Volume85
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding was provided by the National Institute of Health grant numbers R01 DA024598 & R01 DA033862 (PI: Havens, JR), K01 DA033879 (PI: Rudolph, AE), and R21 AI131979 (PI: Rudolph, AE).

Funding Information:
Funding was provided by the National Institute of Health grant numbers R01 DA024598 & R01 DA033862 (PI: Havens, JR), K01 DA033879 (PI: Rudolph, AE), and R21 AI131979 (PI: Rudolph, AE).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Cessation
  • Injection drug use
  • Peer Influence
  • Rural
  • Social network analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

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