Persistent soil seed banks of the globally significant invasive species, Eupatorium adenophorum, in Yunnan Province, south-western China

Youxin Shen, Wenyao Liu, Jerry M. Baskin, Carol C. Baskin, Min Cao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Soil cores were collected at different times between the seed germination and dispersal seasons of Eupatorium adenophorum from 19 sites at five stations with different kinds of vegetation in Yunnan, southwestern China. Mother plants of E. adenophorum were absent from eight of the sites, and their frequency was low at nine other sites. However, persistent soil seed banks were present at all 19 sites. Seed density in the 0-10 cm soil layer varied from 47 to 13,806 seeds m-2, and averaged 2199 seeds m-2. Fifty-seven percent of the seeds of E. adenophorum were in the 0-2 cm soil layer, 24% in the 2-5 cm layer and 19% in the 5-10 cm layer. The percentage of cores from which seedlings emerged ranged from 33-100% across all sites. Seed density and seedling emergence percentages varied significantly among the five stations, and both were positively correlated with abundance of mother plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-162
Number of pages6
JournalSeed Science Research
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Professor Liu Lunhui, a retired E. adenophorum specialist, for help with research activities. This study was supported by China’s National Key Project for Basic Research on Ecosystem Changes in Longitudinal Range-Gorge Region and Trans-boundary Eco-security of Southwest China (No. 2003CB415101) and by the fund for Top One Hundred Young Scientists, CAS (BRJH 2002098).

Keywords

  • Eupatorium adenophorum
  • Invasive weeds
  • Persistent soil seed bank
  • Seedling emergence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

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