Pharmacological correction of long QT-linked mutations in KCNH2 (hERG) increases the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels stored in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum

Jennifer L. Smith, Allison R. Reloj, Parvathi S. Nataraj, Daniel C. Bartos, Elizabeth A. Schroder, Arthur J. Moss, Seiko Ohno, Minoru Horie, Corey L. Anderson, Craig T. January, Brian P. Delisle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

KCNH2 encodes Kv11.1 and underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause the type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels. Drugs that bind to Kv11.1 and block IKr (e.g., E-4031) can act as pharmacological chaperones to increase the trafficking and functional expression for most LQT2 channels (pharmacological correction). We previously showed that LQT2 channels are selectively stored in a microtubuledependent compartment within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in this compartment. Confocal analyses of cells expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 channel G601S showed that the microtubule-dependent ER compartment is the transitional ER. Experiments with E-4031 and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide suggested that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of G601S stored in this compartment. Treating cells in E-4031 or ranolazine (a drug that blocks IKr and has a short half-life) for 30 min was sufficient to cause pharmacological correction. Moreover, the increased functional expression of G601S persisted 4-5 h after drug washout. Coexpression studies with a dominant- negative form of Rab11B, a small GTPase that regulates Kv11.1 trafficking, prevented the pharmacological correction of G601S trafficking from the transitional ER. These data suggest that pharmacological correction quickly increases the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in the transitional ER via a Rab11B-dependent pathway, and we conclude that the pharmacological chaperone activity of drugs like ranolazine might have therapeutic potential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)C919-C930
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology
Volume305
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Keywords

  • Long QT syndrome
  • Potassium channel
  • Trafficking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cell Biology

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