Physical therapists perceptions of school-based practices

Sheryl L. Holt, Janice Kuperstein, Susan K. Effgen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: Surveys have reported that most school-based physical therapists perceive ideal practices are not commonly implemented in their settings. Our aim was to obtain a more in-depth understanding of these perceptions through open-ended inquiry. Methods: Qualitative data were derived from voluntary open-ended responses provided upon completion of a survey regarding school-based physical therapy practice. Of the survey's 561 participants, 250 provided open-ended commentaries that were analyzed using interpretive phenomenology. Results: Six qualitative themes emerged from the open-ended responses, including: In quest: Meeting students school-based needs via physical therapy; Seeking relatedness: Finding working teams in the school system; Building understanding: Developing a voice/identity in the school context; Stretched beyond limits: Managing workloads; Networking: Coordinating services outside school to meet student needs; Defying definition: What does working in an educational model mean? Conclusions: School-based physical therapists seek to meet educationally relevant physical therapy needs of students, ages 3 to 21 years. Successes appear woven of a multitude of factors such as therapist expertise, team dynamics, and district supports.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-395
Number of pages15
JournalPhysical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Actual practices
  • ideal practices
  • related services
  • school-based physical therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Occupational Therapy

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