Placental alkaline phosphatase, insulin, and adenine nucleotides or adenosine synergistically promote long-term survival of serum-starved mouse embryo and human fetus fibroblasts

Qing Bai She, Jagat J. Mukherjee, Taeowan Chung, Zoltan Kiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Earlier we showed that in serum-starved fibroblasts placental alkaline phosphatase (PALP) can exert growth factor-like effects. Here we report that in mouse embryo (NIH 3T3) and human fetus (HTB-157) fibroblasts, PALP (200 nM) alone provided full protection against serum starvation-induced cell death for 5 days. After 12 days, substantial effects of PALP on cell survival required the copresence of insulin (500 nM) and ATP or adenosine (100 μM). In serum-starved NIH 3T3 cells, PALP induced activating phosphorylation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases; insulin, but not ATP, had small additional effects. PALP also stimulated the expression of various cyclins; ATP both prolonged and enhanced PALP-induced expression of cyclins A and E. Finally, ATP/adenosine enhanced activation of Akt kinase by insulin. The results suggest that PALP may be a regulator of growth and remodeling of fetal tissues during the second and third trimester of pregnancy when it is expressed. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)659-665
Number of pages7
JournalCellular Signalling
Volume12
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Sota Tec Fund 343-6027. We thank Mrs. Karan S. Crilly for her contribution to maintain the cell lines and produce the photographs.

Keywords

  • Adenine nucleotides
  • Akt activity
  • Cell survival
  • Cyclin expression
  • Insulin
  • Placental alkaline phosphatase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

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