Planning versus action: Different decision-making processes predict plans to change one's diet versus actual dietary behavior

Marc T. Kiviniemi, Carolyn R. Brown-Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most health decision-making models posit that deciding to engage in a health behavior involves forming a behavioral intention which then leads to actual behavior. However, behavioral intentions and actual behavior may not be functionally equivalent. Two studies examined whether decision-making factors predicting dietary behaviors were the same as or distinct from those predicting intentions. Actual dietary behavior was proximally predicted by affective associations with the behavior. By contrast, behavioral intentions were predicted by cognitive beliefs about behaviors, with no contribution of affective associations. This dissociation has implications for understanding individual regulation of health behaviors and for behavior change interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-568
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 The Author(s).

Keywords

  • affect
  • diet
  • eating
  • eating behavior
  • emotions
  • health behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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