Plasticity following Injury to the Adult Central Nervous System: Is Recapitulation of a Developmental State Worth Promoting?

Dana L. Emery, Nicolas C. Royo, Itzhak Fischer, Kathryn E. Saatman, Tracy K. McIntosh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

The adult central nervous system (CNS) appears to initiate a transient increase in plasticity following injury, including increases in growth-related proteins and generation of new cells. Recent evidence is reviewed that the injured adult CNS exhibits events and patterns of gene expression that are also observed during development and during regeneration following damage to the mature peripheral nervous system (PNS). The growth of neurons during development or regeneration is correlated, in part, with a coordinated expression of growth-related proteins, such as growth-associated-protein-43 (GAP-43), microtubule-associated-protein-1B (MAP1B), and polysialylated-neural-cell-adhesion-molecule (PSA-NCAM). For each of these proteins, evidence is discussed regarding its specific role in neuronal development, signals that modify its expression, and reappearance following injury. The rate of adult hippocampal neurogenesis is also affected by numerous endogenous and exogenous factors including injury. The continuing study of developmental neurobiology will likely provide further gene and protein targets for increasing plasticity and regeneration in the mature adult CNS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1271-1292
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003

Keywords

  • GAP-43
  • Growth associated protein
  • MAP1B
  • PSA-NCAM
  • Regeneration
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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