Prediction of dynamic postural stability during single-leg jump landings by ankle and knee flexibility and strength

J. Williams Valerie, Takashi Nagai, Timothy C. Sell, John P. Abt, Russell S. Rowe, Mark A. McGrail, Scott M. Lephart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: Dynamic postural stability is important for injury prevention, but little is known about how lower-extremity musculoskeletal characteristics (range of motion [ROM] and strength) contribute to dynamic postural stability. Knowing which modifiable physical characteristics predict dynamic postural stability can help direct rehabilitation and injury-prevention programs. Objective: To determine if trunk, hip, knee, and ankle flexibility and strength variables are significant predictors of dynamic postural stability during single-leg jump landings. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: 94 male soldiers (age 28.2 ± 6.2 y, height 176.5 ± 2.6 cm, weight 83.7 ± 26.0 kg). Intervention: None. Main Outcome Measures: Ankle-dorsiflexion and plantar-flexion ROM were assessed with a goniometer. Trunk, hip, knee, and ankle strength were assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer or handheld dynamometer. The Dynamic Postural Stability Index (DPSI) was used to quantify postural stability. Simple linear and backward stepwise-regression analyses were used to identify which physical characteristic variables were significant predictors of DPSI. Results: Simple linear-regression analysis revealed that individually, no variables were significant predictors of the DPSI. Stepwise backward-regression analysis revealed that ankle-dorsiflexion flexibility, ankle-inversion and -eversion strength, and knee-flexion and -extension strength were significant predictors of the DPSI (R2 = .19, P = .0016, adjusted R2 = .15). Conclusion: Ankle-dorsiflexion ROM, ankle-inversion and -eversion strength, and knee-flexion and -extension strength were identified as significant predictors of dynamic postural stability, explaining a small amount of the variance in the DPSI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-272
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • Army
  • Balance
  • Lower extremity
  • Musculoskeletal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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