Predictors of Medication Adherence Using a Multidimensional Adherence Model in Patients With Heart Failure

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147 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Medication adherence in heart failure (HF) is a crucial but poorly understood phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to explore factors contributing to medication adherence in patients with HF by using the World Health Organization's multidimensional adherence model. Methods and Results: Patients (N = 134) with HF (70% were male, aged 61 ± 12 years, 61% with New York Heart Association III/IV) were studied to determine the predictors of medication adherence derived from the multidimensional adherence model. Medication adherence was measured objectively using the medication event monitoring system for 3 months. Three indicators of adherence were assessed by the medication event monitoring system: 1) dose-count, the percentage of prescribed doses taken; 2) dose-days, the percentage of days the correct number of doses were taken; and 3) dose-time, the percentage of doses that were taken on schedule. Barriers to medication adherence, ethnicity, and perceived social support predicted dose-count (P < .001). New York Heart Association functional class, barriers to medication adherence, financial status, and perceived social support predicted dose-day (P < .001). Barriers to medication adherence and financial status predicted dose-time (P = .005). Conclusion: A number of modifiable factors predicted medication adherence in patients with HF, providing specific targets for intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)603-614
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cardiac Failure
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by funding from the Philips Medical-American Association of Critical Care Nurses Outcomes Grant; University of Kentucky General Clinical Research Center (M01RR02602), and Gill Endowment. Also the project was supported by grant number R01 NR008567 from the National Institute of Nursing Research. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Nursing Research or the National Institutes of Health.

Keywords

  • MEMS
  • Medication compliance
  • model testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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