Predictors of substance use disorder treatment and mutual support group participation among Black women across the criminal legal spectrum: A latent class approach

Carrie B. Oser, Myles D. Moody, Anna C. Hansen, Danelle Stevens-Watkins, Michele Staton, Amanda M. Bunting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study includes: 1) identifying classes of substance-related needs among Black women, and 2) examining the effect of substance-related need classes and culturally-relevant factors on Black women's use of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment and mutual support groups. Methods: As part of a longitudinal cohort study, Black women were recruited in prison nearing release, on probation, and in the community without involvement in the criminal legal system (CLS, n=565) and followed-up at 18-months. We conducted a baseline latent class analysis of substance-related needs among Black women. Logistic regression models adjusted for culturally-relevant factors to predict the use of treatment and frequency of mutual support group participation over 18-months among Black women who use drugs. Results: Four classes by level of needs were found: low, daily marijuana use, high mental health, and high comorbidity. During the 18-month follow-up, women characterized by the high comorbidity need class and with higher scores of religious well-being were more likely to frequently participate in mutual support groups. Non-CLS-involved women were less likely to engage with both treatment and mutual support groups than women from the prison sample at 18-months. Conclusions: This study highlights four distinct classes of substance-related needs among Black women, highlighting the complex patterns of behavior and within-racial group differences among Black women. Black women with high comorbidity needs were more likely to participate in mutual support groups, but the latent classes did not predict SUD treatment indicating other non-medical and social contextual need factors may be at play.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111326
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume260
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024

Keywords

  • Black women
  • Culture
  • Latent class analyses
  • Mutual support groups, substance use disorder treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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