Prevention of experimental Haemophilus ducreyi infection: A randomized, controlled clinical trial

Alice C. Thornton, Edward M. O'Mara, Suellyn J. Sorensen, Thomas J. Hiltke, Kate Fortney, Barry Katz, Ronald E. Shoup, Antoinette F. Hood, Stanley M. Spinola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human subjects were infected with Haemophilus ducreyi. All subjects developed papules and were randomized to treatment with a single dose of azithromycin (1 g) or ciprofloxacin (500 mg). At weekly intervals, volunteers were reinoculated with H. ducreyi, and drug concentrations were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). When papules developed, the subjects were treated with antibiotics and dismissed from the study. Eight of the ciprofloxacin-treated subjects developed papules 1 week after the initial treatment, and the ninth subject developed disease 2 weeks after treatment. The 9 azithromycin-treated subjects developed papules 4-10 weeks (mean, 6.8) after the initial treatment (P < .001). Azithromycin was detected in PBMC for 3-6 weeks (mean, 4). Pre- and posttreatment lesions had histology typical of experimental chancroid or were culture positive. Azithromycin prevents experimental chancroid for nearly 2 months. These findings have implications for strategies to prevent chancroid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1608-1613
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume177
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Received 16 September 1997; revised 5 December 1997. Informed consent was obtained from the subjects for participation and for human immunode®ciency virus serology in accordance with the human experimentation guidelines of the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Institutional Review Board of Indiana University±Purdue University Indianapolis. Financial support: NIH (AI-27863, AI-31494, RR-00750, and DK-07532); P®zer, Inc. Reprints or correspondence: Dr. Stanley M. Spinola, Dept. of Medicine, 435 Emerson Hall, 545 Barnhill Dr., Indianapolis, IN 46202 (sspinola@iupui.edu). *Current af®liation: Department of Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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