Program Context, Sensation Seeking, and Attention to Televised Anti‐Drug Public Service Announcements

ELIZABETH PUGZLES LORCH, PHILIP PALMGREEN, LEWIS DONOHEW, DAVID HELM, STAGEY A. BAER, MARGARET U. DSILVA

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined effects of message and program sensation value, sensation seeking, and drug use on visual attention to televised anti‐drug public service announcements (PSAs) among 318 18–22‐year‐olds, who were placed individually in a simulated home environment with the opportunity to read from print media selections and/or watch a half‐hour TV program including two presentations of the test PSA. The TV program was high or low in sensation value. High sensation seekers paid greater attention to high sensation value programming and to PSA embedded in such programming, whereas low sensation seekers paid greater attention to PSA embedded in low sensation value programs. Ongoing attention to a program may help to sustain attention to a subsequent PSA. The findings relate to an activation model of information exposure and indicate that program sensation value and sensation seeking are important factors to be considered in the placement oftelevised drug abuse prevention messages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-412
Number of pages23
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Program Context, Sensation Seeking, and Attention to Televised Anti‐Drug Public Service Announcements'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this