PTSD diagnosis and nonmedical use of benzodiazepines among African American incarcerated men: the mitigating effect of John Henry active coping

Paris B. Wheeler, Brittany Miller-Roenigk, Jasmine Jester, Danelle Stevens-Watkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study examined the relationship between PTSD and nonmedical use of benzodiazepines (BZDs) based on level of John Henry Active Coping (JHAC) among African American incarcerated men. Data were derived from the Helping Incarcerated Men (HIM) Study (n = 208). Nonmedical use of BZDs was measured for the 30 days before incarceration. Current PTSD diagnosis and JHAC were determined using DSM-5 criteria and the JHAC Scale. Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed PTSD diagnosis was significantly associated with nonmedical BZD use (p =.011), but that JHAC did not significantly mitigate this relationship. African American incarcerated men may experience an unmet need with regards to mental health treatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • incarceration
  • John Henryism
  • Nonmedical use of prescription drugs
  • PTSD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

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