Queering settler romance: The reparative eugenic landscape in Nora strange’s Kenyan novels

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

In Nora Strange’s 1933 novel Kenya Noon, a raucous party of Anglo-Kenyan settlers, gin and tonics in hand, exchange limericks satirizing the bad reputation of their community. One “bright young thing” entertains the crowd with the following offering: Adam and Eve after the Fall Settled in Kenya. Now lis’en all! Draped in a skin up to the shin, While he fashioned a boma, She danced in n’goma And let in original sin. (Kenya Noon, 201).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationArchiving Settler Colonialism
Subtitle of host publicationCulture, Space and Race
Pages190-204
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781351142038
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 selection and editorial matter, Yu-ting Huang and Rebecca Weaver- Hightower individual chapters, the contributors.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (all)

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