3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Translational animal models for oral mucositis (OM) are necessary to simulate and assess the bioclinical effects and response in humans. These models should simulate high levels of radiation exposure that leads to oxidative stress and inflammatory-initiated tissue changes. Hamster models have been extensively studied to observe pathological effects of radiation exposure and help in the development of effective treatments. To successfully evaluate the potential for treatment regimens with consistency and relevance, a radiation-induced OM hamster model was developed using a clinical linear accelerator utilized by cancer patients daily. The dose exposure to the isolated, everted cheek pouch of a hamster, as well as the progression of injury, pro-inflammatory marker, histological, and elasticity analyses of the buccal pouch were conducted to verify replicability and reproducibility of the injury model. The findings from this model demonstrated its ability to consistently induce injury and resolution over 28 days using an acute dose of 60 Gy. This model was developed to enhance clinical relevance when evaluating potential efficacious treatments and can now be utilized in efficacy studies to better evaluate developed therapeutics in a preclinical model that is easy to translate to clinical studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-53
Number of pages7
JournalAnimal Models and Experimental Medicine
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was completed under support through NIH SBIR Phase II Award R44DE023523. The authors acknowledge Kelley Wiegman, Dustin Savage, and Brock Howerton for their assistance in the processing procedures for the ELISA assays conducted by Jennifer Moylan at the Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences. Furthermore, the authors acknowledge Dr. Kryscio for providing the statistical analysis on the inflammatory marker level studies and would also like to acknowledge the Markey Cancer Center and the generosity of using their TrueBeam Linear Accelerator.

Funding Information:
This work was completed under support through NIH SBIR Phase II Award R44DE023523. The authors acknowledge Kelley Wiegman, Dustin Savage, and Brock Howerton for their assistance in the processing procedures for the ELISA assays conducted by Jennifer Moylan at the Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences. Furthermore, the authors acknowledge Dr. Kryscio for providing the statistical analysis on the inflammatory marker level studies and would also like to acknowledge the Markey Cancer Center and the generosity of using their TrueBeam Linear Accelerator.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Animal Models and Experimental Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of The Chinese Association for Laboratory Animal Sciences.

Keywords

  • animal models
  • radiotherapy
  • stomatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medical Laboratory Technology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Veterinary (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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