Rapport, motivation, participation, and perceptions of learning in U.S. and Turkish student classrooms: a replication and cultural comparison

Brandi N. Frisby, Amanda R. Slone, Elif Bengu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Building on previous rapport research, Hofstede’s dimensions of culture, and calls for culture-centered instructional research, this study examined instructor–student rapport in U.S. and Turkish college classrooms. U.S. participants (N = 143) and Turkish participants (N = 185) completed measures of rapport, state motivation, participation, and perceptions of learning. Results revealed no differences in state motivation and perceptions of learning, but U.S. students reported significantly more rapport with their instructors while Turkish students reported significantly more participation in the classroom. Rapport significantly predicted state motivation, participation, and perceptions of learning in both samples, but accounted for different levels of variance in the student outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-195
Number of pages13
JournalCommunication Education
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 National Communication Association.

Keywords

  • Culture
  • participation
  • perceived learning
  • rapport
  • state motivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics

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